FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: October 11, 2004
CONTACT: Leigh Ann Asklar, (850) 245-2112

FLORIDA TAKES A CLOSER LOOK AT THE CHANGING EARTH

--Earth Science Week promotes environmental stewardship through sound science--

TALLAHASSEE – Recognizing the important role earth sciences have on our world, Governor Jeb Bush joined states across the nation in proclaiming the Seventh Annual Earth Science Week. Extending from October 10-16, classrooms and scientists across the nation will educate citizens about natural hazards. This year’s theme, “Living on a Restless Earth,” encourages us to explore our connection with the Earth’s underlying aquifer systems and geologic frameworks.

“Earth sciences provide the foundation for protecting Florida’s citizens and the environment from the natural hazards that pose a threat to our state,” said DEP Secretary Colleen M. Castille. “Using state-of-the-art technology, we are monitoring Florida’s aquifer, protecting springs and the Everglades and effectively managing Florida’s resources”

Using observations and measurements from space, underwater and underground, geoscientists evaluate Earth’s present state, foresee future changes and assess effects on life and society. The Department of Environmental Protection’s (DEP) Florida Geological Survey investigates and monitors the state’s important aquifer systems and geology to protect public health and natural resources and ensure sound environmental management.

The Florida Geological Survey will host an open house featuring activities and tours that educate the public on how earth sciences affect our daily lives on Wednesday, October 13, from 10 am to 4 pm and 6:30 to 8:30 pm, at the Gunter Building on the Florida State University campus in Tallahassee.

For more Earth Science Week activities, visit http://www.floridadep.org/geology/events/earth_sci_week_2004.htm

For more information visit, http://www.floridadep.org/geology/