Earth Science Week Update December 2018

EARTH SCIENCE WEEK UPDATE
American Geosciences Institute 
Vol. 16, No. 12: December 2018

IN THIS ISSUE...


Earth Science Week 2019 Theme: Geoscience Is for Everyone'

AGI is pleased to announce that the theme of Earth Science Week 2019 will be "Geoscience Is for Everyone." The coming year's event will emphasize both the inclusive potential and the importance of the geosciences in the lives of all people.
 
All are welcomed to join in this creative endeavor through our available learning resources and activities. The coming year's theme will encourage individuals of all backgrounds, ages, and abilities to engage with the geosciences, whether that is as a geoscience professional, a hobbyist, or through civic engagement. Because each person has a role in the areas that geoscientists study-including Earth's resources, natural hazards, and understanding the wonder of our environment-geoscience truly is for everyone.

Earth Science Week is supported by many organizations, including the U.S. Geological Survey; the AAPG Foundation; National Park Service; NASA; Society for Mining, Metallurgy and Exploration; Geological Society of America; American Geophysical Union; Association of American State Geologists; AmericaView; Howard Hughes Medical Institute; and Archeological Institute of America. We are also excited to work with other organizations that specialize in diversity, equity, and inclusion.
 

Earth Science Teaching Award: See the Webcast

With a little more than a month left to apply, now is the time to go online and view a new webcast about the prestigious Edward C. Roy, Jr. Award for Excellence in K-8 Earth Science Teaching. The free, two-minute webcast provides an overview of the competition. To view the webcast, visit http://www.earthsciweek.org/webcasts/EdRoy.

AGI has expanded the eligibility requirements. In addition to U.S. teachers, instructors in the United Kingdom may compete. The program, a major part of Earth Science Week, recognizes one full-time teacher from kindergarten to eighth grade, or the U.K. equivalent, for leadership and innovation in Earth science education.

To enter the 2019 competition, applications must be postmarked by January 18, 2019. The winner will receive a $2,500 prize and a travel grant of $1,000 to attend the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) Annual Conference in April 2019 to accept the award. To learn more, teachers should visit http://www.americangeosciences.org/education/awards/roy.


National Fossil Day Contest Names Winners

Winners of the 2018 National Fossil Day Art Contest were recently announced by the National Park Service, a major Earth Science Week partner. To view the artworks of winners in four categories - ages 5 to 8, 9 to 13, 14 to 18, and 19 and up - please visit https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossilday/nfd-art-contest-winners-gallery.htm.

The National Park Service teamed up with AGI to launch the first annual National Fossil Day during Earth Science Week 2010. Since then, the program has grown enormously in reach and resources for students and teachers. Plans already are being made for the next National Fossil Day on Wednesday, October 16, 2019. Learn more at https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossilday/index.htm.


More Classroom Activities Now Searchable Online

Ever wish you could go online to search for a classroom activity tailor-made to match the Earth science topic you're teaching? Visit the Earth Science Week Classroom Activities page - continually updated and recently redesigned - for more than 120 free learning activities, most of them contributed by the leading geoscience agencies and groups that are Earth Science Week partners.

Activities are organized and searchable by various criteria, including specific Earth science topics. To find the perfect activity for your lesson, just click on "Search Classroom Activities." Search by grade levels and Next Generation Science Standards. Maybe most useful, you also can search among 24 categories of Earth science topics, from energy and environment to plate tectonics and weathering. 

This database-driven resource is ideal not only for supplementing a prepared curriculum, but also for generating activities that address in-the-news events such as fossil discoveries and volcanic eruptions. See the Classroom Activities page at http://www.earthsciweek.org/classroom-activities.


AAPG Recognizes Top Geoscience Teacher

Submit your entry now! The American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG) Foundation, a longtime Earth Science Week partner, will award $6,000 at the AAPG Annual Convention and Exhibition in San Antonio in May 2019 to its Teacher of the Year (TOTY).

The award will once again be granted to a K-12 teacher within the United States who has demonstrated outstanding leadership in the field of geoscience education. Six teachers across the country will be identified as finalists, each from one of six U.S. geographic regions (Pacific, Rocky Mountain, Mid-Continent, Southwest, Gulf Coast, and Eastern).

After final nominations are decided, the TOTY Committee will convene to pick the final winner of the 2019 Teacher of the Year Award. The runner-up section finalists will each receive an honorable mention and a $500 cash award for their nomination.

The application deadline is February 1, 2019. To learn more, see http://foundation.aapg.org/programs/toty/index.cfm.


Geoscience Policy Site Shows Real-World Relevance

AGI, the organizer of Earth Science Week, has a Geoscience Policy Department that works with AGI member societies and policy makers to provide a focused voice for the shared interests of the geoscience profession in the federal policy process.

Geoscience Policy tracks and analyzes policy issues; updates the geoscience community through news briefs that cover federal legislation, appropriations, and hearings; organizes meetings, briefings, testimony and written submissions on geoscience policy issues. Find out more here.

The department's Critical Issues program provides a portal to decision-relevant, impartial geoscience information. By aggregating material from multiple organizations in one place, the Critical Issues website makes it easier for users to find comprehensive information from across the geosciences.

Critical Issues features easy-to-digest peer-reviewed summaries, answers to common questions, and links to more detailed resources. Learn more online.


Find Your Photos Online for Earth Science Week

Want to see yourself and your students on the Earth Science Week website? Simply send us photographs from your Earth Science Week celebrations and activities (along with any required permission forms). We'll post selected images on the Earth Science Week Photo Gallery.

By submitting a photo, you represent that the image is an original work, and you are the sole owner of all rights to the photo. You also agree to allow AGI to use your name to post on the AGI website, without compensation unless prohibited. You retain your rights to the photo but grant to AGI a royalty-free, worldwide, perpetual, nonexclusive license to publicly display, distribute, reproduce and create derivative works of the photo, in whole or in part, in any media now existing or later developed, for any AGI purpose, including, but not limited to, advertising and promotion. AGI will not be required to pay any additional consideration or seek any additional approval in connection with such uses.

You can snap shots with your digital camera or cell phone, or scan regular photos for electronic transmission. JPEG files are preferred. Download permission forms from the website and send your photos to info@earthsciweek.org . See you online!


See Yourself in an Earth Science Career

Earth Science Week can help you explore career opportunities in the geosciences. If you became an Earth scientist, for example, what would you actually do? What funds are available to help pay for your studies? How could you get real-world work experience while still being a student?

For the answers to questions like these, look no further than "Geoscience Career, Scholarship, and Internship Resources." This recent addition to the Earth Science Week website can help you learn how to build a geoscience career - in fields such as oceanography, paleontology, seismology, mineralogy, meteorology, geophysics, petroleum geology, environmental science, and space science.

The site includes dozens of links to online resources offered by AGI member societies, program partners, and other governmental, corporate, and nonprofit organizations in the geoscience community. To learn more, visit http://www.earthsciweek.org/career-resources.


AMS Teacher Professional Development Courses for 2019

The American Meteorological Society (AMS), AGI's newest member society, is promoting two teacher professional development courses for 2019, perfect for lovers of atmospheric science and oceanography.

Project Atmosphere is a hybrid teacher professional development course with a one-week summer residence experience and online components. It is offered by the American Meteorological Society Education Program in partnership with California University of Pennsylvania (Cal U), and with funding from NOAA. This project is specifically designed for K-12, precollege, teachers who teach science courses with atmospheric content. The course introduces them to the latest technologies for sensing, analyzing, and forecasting weather, and classroom applications.

Workshops take place annually each summer at the NOAA National Weather Service Training Center in Kansas City, MO. Participants receive a $300 stipend, lodging, meals, travel funds, and instructional materials, and must be prepared to pay the Cal U academic support fee (currently $150; see website for details). Three tuition-free graduate credits are earned following successful completion of course requirements including required peer-training sessions.

The next workshop will take place from 28 July - 3 August 2019. The application deadline is 1 April 2019.  

The Maury Project is a teacher professional development course with a two-week summer residence workshop in Annapolis, MD, focused on the fundamentals of oceanography.  It is offered by the American Meteorological Society Education Program in partnership with California University of Pennsylvania (Cal U), and with funding from the U.S. Navy. This course focuses on improving teacher effectiveness in generating interest and understanding in science, technology, and mathematics among precollege students. The project is named after Matthew Fontaine Maury, considered by many as the father of oceanography.

Workshops take place each summer and include lectures, hands on activities, and valuable field experience. Participants receive a $600 stipend, lodging, meals, travel funds, and instructional materials, and must be prepared to pay the Cal U academic support fee (currently $150; see website for details). Three tuition-free graduate credits are earned following successful completion of the summer course requirements including required peer-training sessions.

The next workshop will take place in the time frame of 14 - 26 July 2019. The application deadline is 1 April 2019.


The American Geosciences Institute is a nonprofit federation of geoscientific and professional associations that represents more than 250,000 geologists, geophysicists and other earth scientists. Founded in 1948, AGI provides information services to geoscientists, serves as a voice of shared interests in the profession, plays a major role in strengthening geoscience education, and strives to increase public awareness of the vital role the geosciences play in society's use of resources, resiliency to natural hazards, and interaction with the environment. For contact information, please visit us online

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