maps

Activity: Visualizing terrain with maps

Traditional geologic maps — sometimes crisscrossed with lines, blotted with colors, and marked with strike and dip symbols — have been used to depict the geologic makeup of the Earth for many years. New technologies such as satellite-enabled remote sensing are allowing geoscientists to create and use maps of greater richness and complexity than ever before.
 

Best Student Map Competition

As part of Geologic Map Day (October 16, 2015) and Earth Science Week, the U.S. Geological Survey invited university-level students to enter its 2015 Best Student Geologic Map Competition. The contest will be judged at the Geological Society of America’s Annual Meeting in Baltimore, Maryland, November 1-4, 2015.

Eye of the Storm

A tropical storm is brewing in the Atlantic Ocean. It’s causing rain and thunderstorms over the Caribbean, and it will soon be a tropical depression — the beginning of a hurricane. By the time Hurricane Mitch leaves the Central America, more than 11,000 people will be dead and as many as 18,000 more will be missing. (Activity adapted from Mapping Our World at http://edcommunity.esri.com/MOW.)

Geologic Map Day

Welcome to Geologic Map Day, a special event designed to promote awareness of geologic mapping and its vital importance to society.

Geologic Map Day Resources

To learn more about geologic maps, see:

USGS

Geologic Maps & Earthquakes

You can find out a great deal of information from geologic maps — from the types of rocks that make up a rock unit to the age of those rocks and the angle at which the rock bed is tilted. By identifying fractures and fracture zones in rock, geologic maps can even tell you where known faults are located.

Geologic Maps and Groundwater

You can find out a great deal of information from geologic maps — from the types of rocks that make up a rock unit to the age of those rocks and the angle at which the rock bed is tilted. By identifying fractures and fracture zones in rock, geologic maps can even tell you where known faults are located.

Geologic Maps and Natural Hazards

What Do Geologic Maps Tell Us About the Locations of Natural Hazards?

Global GIS Lesson

In this lesson, students use Geographic Information Systems (GIS) together with the tools and data from the North America Global GIS CD to investigate earthquakes, volcanoes, and population from a local to global scale.

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